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Pakistan falters on terrorism funding

November 16, 2012

Much like the recent ultimatum given to Turkey for its insufficient laws against the financing of terrorism, FATF may blacklist Pakistan if it doesn’t update its laws against money laundering and the financing of militants.

In an editorial from the Express Tribune (h/t El Grillo), even the journalists of Pakistan realize that the government should stop pointing fingers, and comply with FATF’s guidance to do more to address the actual problem of terrorism, which has led to 40,000 deaths in Pakistan:

Blocking terrorist funding

The United Nations can slap Iran and North Korea-like sanctions on Pakistan next year if the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) standards on curbing money laundering and terror financing are not met. In an attempt to ward off this threat, Pakistan is now lobbying to seek international support and feels that the reason it is being targeted is because the FATF is heavily dominated by Western countries and India. Instead of being worried about the FATF’s member countries’ “political motives”, Pakistan should focus on meeting the requirements set by the international anti-money laundering watchdog, as curbing terrorism is something that should be our top priority in any case. Pakistan has suffered the most from home-grown terror; we have lost more than 40,000 lives in terror attacks. The fact that non-state actors have managed to launch cross-border terror attacks and planned attacks in other countries has put Pakistan in further trouble.

The government has reportedly improved the current legislation on counterterrorism financing, which will soon be presented before parliament for approval. The anti-terror legislation must be brought forward as soon as possible. It is an open secret how some terrorist organisations use to have links to elements within the establishment. Since the government was unable to stop these elements from pursuing a deeply flawed policy, the least it can do is put a firm stop to terrorist-funding by bringing in a strong anti-terror legislation. Money laundering is one of the primary sources of finance through which terrorist groups are able to fund their activities. If this source of financing can be cut off, we would be able to somewhat control our terror problems.

Pakistanis live in constant fear of terror attacks on both military and civilian targets. Ridding our soil of terrorists is a win-win for both Pakistan and the international community. It is about time we took this important step and brought forward the anti-terror legislation.

In a sane world, Pakistan would have already been recognized globally for its state sponsorship of terrorism years ago.  But to the degree that international pressure will bring about some marginal legal and financial reform, FATF’s standards are probably a helpful incentive.

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One comment

  1. […] has been cited before by the Financial Action Task Force for its financial regulatory deficiencies.  Despite the history of shortcomings, Western nations have continued to saturate Pakistan with […]



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