Posts Tagged ‘sound’

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ISNA selection highlights procurement problem

March 23, 2014

The Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) was a co-conspirator in the Holy Land Foundation’s financing of Hamas.  Yet INSA is being used as an endorsing agency for the selection of Muslim chaplains to serve in the military.

The reliance on ISNA as an endorsing agency is reminiscent of bid scandals in Afghanistan in which U.N. and U.S. officials have awarded contracts without adequately reviewing the bona fides of the contractor or subcontractor.

ISNA vetted two recently selected chaplains, but who vetted ISNA?  Is there no system in place to screen the endorsing agencies for ties to terrorism before they are selected?

Ryan Mauro from the Clarion Project explains this disturbing story in a Mar. 5 interview with Steve Doocy on the Fox News Channel.  Take a listen:


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Jihad aspirant pleads guilty in California

January 17, 2014

In a reversal of his initial plea, Sinh Vinh Ngo Nguyen (a.k.a. Hasan Abu Omar Ghannoum) has pleaded guilty to attempting to provide material support for terrorism.  Nguyen intended to travel to Pakistan to train Al Qaeda operatives.

The two-minute clip below is the audio from a Dec. 27 televised report by Dave Lopez at KCAL, the CBS affiliate in Los Angeles.  The voice you’ll hear from the man saying “we don’t see a lot of these cases” is Thom Mrozek’s—a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in L.A.


For the record, we do see many of these cases.  Far too many.

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Ayatollah amasses $95b in expropriated assets

November 27, 2013

Reuters has published a three-part report (hat tip to Sal) on how the Iranian agency Setad, purportedly an office administering unclaimed property, is actually a vessel for confiscating the assets of regime opponents, religious minorities, and emigrants.  Setad then auctions off those assets to make more money for the Ayatollah Khamenei.

Kai Ryssdal of the radio program Marketplace interviewed one of the Reuters reporters about the investigation.  Take a listen:


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Eritrean tells of $30K ransom for captive cousin

October 27, 2013

The BBC has interviewed yet another Eritrean with a tragic story to tell about Islamist (or as the BBC calls them, “tribal”) kidnap-for-ransom schemes being conducted against hapless refugees trying to make across Sinai to a better world in Israel.

His cousin was burned, raped, and was only released after extended relatives were able to meet a ransom demand of $30,000—a big amount anywhere, but especially exorbitant for that part of the world.

The interview doesn’t get into it, but the ransom money from these kidnappings is often used to purchase weapons for Hamas.

Listen—it’s just a one-minute clip:


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Freed Belgian tells how he was “sold” by the Free Syrian Army to a jihadist group

October 13, 2013

In April, Pierre Piccinin da Prata, a teacher from Belgium, was visiting Syria under the promise of protection by the Free Syrian Army.  Suddenly, he and his colleague, an Italian journalist, were sold as hostages to a group of Islamist fighters.

Pierre says the Islamists “wanted money.” Pierre says they were called dogs, and “we were considered as not really human beings.”  The only real men, the captives were told, are Sunni, Arab Muslims.  His colleague was subjected to mock executions.

After months of being held hostage, Pierre wanted to commit suicide rather than endure further humiliation and captivity, but was eventually released.

Listen to a few minutes of Pierre’s story in his own words during a Sept. 20 interview with the BBC:


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Qatar gives Libyan arms to Syrian rebels

July 7, 2013

Weapons used during the rebellion against Qaddafi have been spirited out of Libya by agents of Qatar.  The arms are smuggled through Turkey across the Syrian border.  The guns transferred by Qatar are said to be going to fighters who are more extreme and Islamist than the rebels being supported by the Obama administration.

Take a listen to NPR’s four-minute interview with one of the New York Times journalists who reported on the story:


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Following the money in early Islam

January 13, 2013

The Koran dictates that 20 percent of the booty or spoils of war, known as khums, belongs to Allah and Muhammad.  As Iraqi expatriate I.Q. al-Rassooli points out in this talk entitled “Allah’s Share of the Plunder,” does it really make sense that Allah needs a cut of the spoils?  What’s the exact breakdown between Muhammad and Allah—10 percent for each?  The only logical explanation is that Muhammad got it all.  What kind of religion would devise such a system?  As al-Rassooli points out, the kind of religion that attracted other men who believed that they too could become very wealthy from plundering and looting non-believers.  This is about 5 minutes long:


Revisit another great analysis from Mr. Rassooli here.

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Audio: the first rich Arab patron of jihad

January 3, 2013

Abu Bakr sponsored the military campaigns in the early days of conquest by Muhammad.  Khadija gave Muhammad enough money to help him attract followers, but it was the even wealthier Abu Bakr who helped buy the weapons and horses of Islam’s holy war against unbelievers.

A new recording from the British Islamic studios of Al Baseera highlight’s Muhammad’s praise for Abu Bakr’s role in funding the “deen” (or “dīn,” which can be translated from Arabic to English as “religion”).

It’s just 80 seconds long—take a listen:


Abu Bakr famously contributed all of his money to fund the Battle of Tabuk, an opening salvo in the Byzantine-Arab wars.  The implicit theme of messages like this is for rich Muslims to follow suit and fund jihad today.

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Hezbollah credit card fraudster re-arrested

September 23, 2012

Rafic Labboun, a.k.a. Wilhelm Dick, has been arrested with fellow Hezbollah operatives in the Yucutan peninsula, Mexico.  Labboun had previously been convicted in federal court for a $100,000 credit card scheme.  Take a listen to the report from CBS radio’s San Francisco affiliate:


An imam no less!  Who would know better Islam’s call to defraud the West of its wealth for the cause of jihad?

By the way, isn’t this further evidence of Hezbollah’s presence in Mexico?

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The fairy tale of Muhammad dying in poverty

July 8, 2012

The would-be heirs of Muhammad’s wealth: Ali (left) and Fatima (right), with their children on Muhammad’s lap

Why would Fatima and Abu Bakr engage in a protracted dispute over the inheritance of the estate of Muhammad (see the Sahih Muslim, Book 19, No. 4354) if, as Muhammad’s wife Aisha (“Mother of the Believers”) described, Muhammad died a poor man with his armor mortgaged to a Jew in Medina?  What happened to the enormous wealth of Khadija, Muhammad’s first wife, after she died?  Would he not have inherited it?

These provocative questions are raised and answered in an excellent 10 minute lecture by Iraqi exile I.Q. al Rassooli, author of Lifting the Veil and blogger at the-koran.blogspot.com and inthenameofallah.org.

This talk also covers many issues which we have highlighted over the past few years about Muhammad’s personal accumulation of wealth through taxes (particularly khums and fai) that he claimed were mandated by Allah.

We don’t normally post audio that’s longer than five minutes, but it is worth the time:


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Holton to Congress: Currently no disclosure or transparency standards for zakat, sharia products

June 17, 2012

Chris Holton, vice president at the Center for Security Policy and editor of Shariah Finance Watch, recently briefed staff members from ten Congressional offices on sharia-compliant finance.  During a question and answer period, staffers showed particular interest in the lack of disclosure and transparency requirements on Islamic finance.

One questioner asked Mr. Holton whether, even after all the new financial regulations of Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank, there are still truly no reporting requirements for banks to disclose whether they have sharia portfolios and where their zakat expenditures are directed.  You’ve got to listen to the answer during three minutes of powerful audio from the the briefing:


In an era where nearly every single aspect of the U.S. financial sector is taxed, regulated, and scrutinized, it is remarkable that banks are not required to tell investors whether the products marketed to them as “ethical” are actually sharia products, that the banks do not have to disclose what charities receive zakat from the Islamic bank divisions and sharia boards, and or even such basic information as whether the bank has a sharia division.

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