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The $20,000 behind the Paris attacks came “from abroad”

January 14, 2015

Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) gave $20,000 to future Charlie Hebdo attacker Said Kouachi before he and his brother left Yemen in August 2011 according to CBS News yesterday (h/t El Grillo), which supports Money Jihad analysis of the Kouachis’ funding earlier this week. The report also adds credibility to claims by AQAP and Cherif Kouachi himself that the Charlie Hebdo attacks were planned, ordered, and financed by AQAP itself. The physical transfer of funds to Kouachi suggests that bulk cash smuggling (or the smuggling of other financial instruments) back to Europe was the method used rather than a wire, hawala transaction, or trade-based money laundering operation.

Relatedly, the Associated Press reported weapons for the Paris terrorist attacks came from abroad:

Several people are being sought in relation to the “substantial” financing of the three gunmen behind the terror campaign, said Christophe Crepin, a French police union official. The gunmen’s weapons stockpile came from abroad, and the size of it plus the military sophistication of the attacks indicated an organized terror network, he added.

“This cell did not include just those three, we think with all seriousness that they had accomplices, because of the weaponry, the logistics and the costs of it,” Crepin said. “These are heavy weapons. When I talk about things like a rocket launcher – it’s not like buying a baguette on the corner, it’s for targeted acts.”

The Belgian daily La Dernière Heure corroborates that several of the weapons acquired by the Kouachi brothers and Amedy Coulibaly were bought in Brussels.

The $20,000 figure reported by CBS is also consistent with an estimate over the weekend from counterterror expert Jean-Paul Rouiller. Bloomberg Businessweek reported:

…The Kalashnikov rifles and other weapons used by the attackers, Chérif and Saïd Kouachi and Amedy Coulibaly, likely cost less than €10,000 ($11,800), according to Jean-Paul Rouiller, director of the Geneva Centre for Training and Analysis of Terrorism, a Swiss research group. Including the cost of Saïd Kouachi’s 2011 trip to Yemen, where he may have received training from al-Qaeda, the total price tag for the deadly attacks by the three men might have reached about $20,000…

Bloomberg went on to report that, “for what Rouiller describes as ‘such a low-cost operation,’ financing from abroad would be unlikely”—a theory that now seems to have been disproved by the evidence.

Regardless of where it is finally determined that the funds for the weapons originated, it should be kept in mind that the direct expenses of the Kouachi brothers and Amedy Coulibaly aren’t the only expenditures that matter. The weapons training camp in Yemen that both Kouachi brothers attended in 2011 wasn’t “self-financed” by individual AQAP recruits. The militants at the AQAP camp that trained the Kouachi brothers didn’t self-finance their own wages. The human smuggling network that helped sneak the Kouachi brothers across the border from Oman into Yemen isn’t self-financed. Anwar al-Awlaki, the terrorist imam with whom the Kouachi brothers met while in Yemen and possibly assigned them their marching orders, was not self-financed either. Not to mention that the Kouachi brothers’ basic cost of living in Paris probably wasn’t met by part-time work delivering pizzas and gutting fish at the market.

We will also discover over time that the websites, texts, and videos that the Kouachis and Coulibaly consumed, like most Islamic radical materials, are generally produced by entities backed by Wahhabi patrons. It is important to think of the bigger picture not just of the money it took to carry out the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher operations, but the amount of money it takes to sustain a terrorist infrastructure in Yemen (and beyond) that these sleeper cells count on for arms, training and guidance.

4 comments

  1. […] The $20,000 behind the Paris attacks came “from abroad” […]


  2. […] Money Jihad, Jan. 14, 2015: […]


  3. It is the second time (?) we find Cofidis financing terrorists?

    “Amedy Coulibaly avait contracté un prêt à la consommation de 6000 euros chez Cofidis le 4 décembre 2014, selon les informations de La Voix du Nord, qui émet l’hypothèse que le terroriste a pu utiliser cette somme pour financer les actions des frères Kouachi.”
    http://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/societe/amedy-coulibaly-a-pu-financer-ses-attentats-par-un-credit-a-la-consommation_1640488.html

    “Yassine, prothésiste dentaire à Paris, forme le projet de partir faire le djihad après avoir reçu la nouvelle de la mort de deux amis partis en Afghanistan, en 2011. Il n’a jamais songé à attaquer la France mais plutôt à partir se battre sur le champ de bataille. La Syrie se révèle bien plus facile d’accès que le Mali et AQMI auxquels il avait d’abord songé. Yassine, fasciné par la dimension eschatologique liée au pays de Sham dans le Coran, abandonne sa femme qui ne peut l’accompagner, en épouse une autre qui doit elle se marier avant de partir en Syrie. Il finance son expédition avec 10 000 euros de sa poche, des mandats venus de personnes qui soutiennent le djihad financièrement à travers toute l’Europe, mais aussi en escroquant les boîtes de crédit Sofinco et Cofidis. La pratique est montrée aux autres apprentis djihadistes via des vidéos faites ensuite”
    http://historicoblog3.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/david-thomson-les-francais-jihadistes.html


  4. […] Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) gave $20,000 to future Charlie Hebdo attacker Said Kouachi before he and his brother left Yemen in […]



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