Posts Tagged ‘fracking’

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Fracking lets us ditch Saudi oil to use our own

September 26, 2014

As part of the run-up to Money Jihad’s five-year anniversary, we’re looking back at five important videos from over the past several years about the financing of terrorism.

Last week we looked at money that has been pumped into the Gulf monarchies in oil royalties that they have turned around to use for terror for decades to placate their own Wahhabi domestic religious/political partners.  But what are we going to do about it? Drill our way out. U.S. energy independence from Arab oil, largely driven by technological innovation through hydraulic fracturing, may be the biggest strategic game-changer in the global balance of power since World War II.

From a Fox News interview last year with the Wall Street Journal’s Steve Moore and national security analyst KT McFarland:

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Marcellus bolsters U.S. energy freedom

October 15, 2013

Fracking the Bakken in North Dakota, the Eagle Ford in Texas, and the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania and neighboring states yields more than job growth and economic opportunities for Americans—it’s creating a new era of independence from Arab oil.  Jim Cawley, the lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, has written a column giving a very clear and vivid explanation of this sea change in global affairs and what it means for his constituents:

…In October 1973 oil exporting nations cut off exports to the United States as punishment for our support of Israel — the lone democracy in the Middle East.

Gasoline prices jumped. Home heating prices soared because the price of a barrel of oil dictated the price of everything else energy related.

Families were told to turn down the thermostats to 68 or lower, and cars lined up for miles outside service stations that were still running. Inflation combined with a slowed economy to usher in the “era of malaise.”

We were hostages in our own land.

Jump ahead 40 years and consider the words of Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal: “Rising North American shale gas production is an inevitable threat” to the economy of Saudi Arabia.

Think about that.

Forty years after the embargo, a major OPEC country is worrying about America’s emerging energy independence. They have good reason.

Saudi oil exports to the United States have declined, as have exports from Algeria and Nigeria.

And as October got underway, The Wall Street Journal reported that the United States, home of the Marcellus fields, has ascended to the rank of top energy-producing country in the world.

We are talking about American energy independence – a term coined amid mile-long gas station lines and in the speeches of politicians who knew we needed to do something but had no idea what.

Our natural-gas resources are so abundant that the prices of oil and natural gas have become decoupled. There was a time when a jump in oil prices meant a corresponding rise in natural gas.

Not so today. Petroleum is selling at twice what it cost a decade ago. Natural gas prices have fallen by half.

Recently, the [Pennsylvania Gov. Tom] Corbett administration announced an initiative to expand natural gas refueling stations on our state’s highways.

It’s disappointing that some Harrisburg Democrats are lining up behind their state party’s call for an end to hydraulic fracturing, the technology that made energy independence possible.

They are, in short, calling for an abrupt halt to 30,000 direct jobs in the state’s natural-gas industry and an attack on 200,000 more jobs that depend on or benefit from the Marcellus Shale industry.

We’re talking about Marcellus jobs that sustain families, enrich communities and spin off countless economic benefits that reach from the gas fields to the neighborhoods of Philadelphia…

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The Middle East and your price at the pump

September 30, 2013

What to do about Syria?  One thing is to rid ourselves of the remaining vestiges of oil dependence on that part of the world.

In a recent op-ed in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Chris Faulkner points out that Syrian energy output is minimal, but the political volatility puts a Middle Eastern premium onto our gas bills.  If we pursue further steps toward energy self-reliance in North America, we could minimize the risks of price volatility and supply disruptions.

Policies being proposed by the energy sector are making more sense than the policies being pursued by our elected officials.  Read it all:

Energy independence is the best response to Syria crisis

When an American missile strike in Syria seemed inevitable, oil futures shot up to a two-year high. Just days later, as U.S. officials began considering a diplomatic response, prices fell.

Many analysts have blamed these fluctuations on investor overreaction — Syria provides less than 0.1 percent of the world’s oil. But such assessments are dangerously naïve.

Any intervention in Syria would have impacted America’s access to oil and no one can safely assume there won’t be another Middle East crisis on the horizon.

That’s why the United States must reduce its dependence on Middle Eastern oil.

Syria might not be a major oil producer or exporter, but one of President Bashar Assad’s chief supporters, Iran, holds the world’s fourth-largest proven conventional oil reserves.

More than that, Iran controls the Strait of Hormuz, a shipping lane that’s essential to the transport of roughly 35 percent of all seaborne oil.

There’s no telling what an Iranian response to a U.S. attack on Syria might look like, but if the mullahs even hint at shutting down the Strait, oil prices could jump dramatically.

The ripple effects of a U.S. military action wouldn’t stop there. A strike against Assad’s regime would inflame relations with other oil-rich nations.

The conflict has already worsened sectarian tensions in Iraq, OPEC’s second-largest producer of crude oil.

Even defusing the Syrian crisis won’t end the civil war there, nor diminish the prospect of future strife, rebellions, or war. Indeed, the Syrian civil war has stoked anew the centuries-old enmity between Islamic sects that threatens to engulf the entire region — a region that holds more than half of the world’s proven conventional oil reserves.

The situation in Syria has made clear why it’s so important for the United States to make certain our energy interests aren’t tied to the volatile politics of the Middle East.

In practice, this means embracing technologies like hydraulic fracturing, horizontal drilling and projects like the Keystone XL pipeline. These represent historic opportunities for America to gain greater control over our own energy security.

In the case of Keystone XL, a proposed pipeline that would deliver crude from western Canada’s vast oil sands to America’s Gulf Coast, the Obama Administration could dramatically increase the amount of oil we receive from our neighbor to the north.

The U.S. Department of Energy has estimated that, once completed, the pipeline would deliver as much as 830,000 barrels of oil a day, or roughly half of what we currently import from the Middle East…

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Fueling ourselves leaves Saudi Arabia in the dust

September 9, 2013

Increased domestic energy production is enabling the United States to pursue its own foreign policy objectives without having to run a three legged race with Saudi Arabia.  Hydraulic fracturing allows America to begin to separate itself from a distant monarchy that imposes ruthless sharia law on its people and funds terrorism around the world.  Reuters has the story:

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OPEC weakened thanks to fracking

August 15, 2013

Evidence indicates once again that hydraulic fracturing techniques in the oil and gas industry are helping to turbocharge North American energy production and reduce the thirst for oil from the Middle East and OPEC.  Rather than combating the financing of terrorism by maintaining onerous regulations on banks and intrusive data mining programs on bank customers, the more effective approach in the long run may be unshackling the private sector and encouraging growth in domestic oil and gas markets to reduce dependence on hostile regimes overseas.

FuelFix blog reports:

Demand for OPEC’s crude will slip by 300,000 barrels a day next year to 29.6 million a day next year, or about 2.6 percent less than the 12-member group is pumping now, the organization said in its first set of forecasts for 2014…

Dependence on OPEC’s crude is slipping as the U.S. and Canada unlock unconventional oil supplies from deep underground shale deposits with new drilling techniques. Brent crude futures have slipped 2.7 percent this year, trading at about $108 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe exchange today, amid signs of slowing growth in China and uneven recovery in the U.S., the world’s biggest oil consumers…

Energy in Depth blog adds:

This great news also comes on the heels of a report by the Energy Information Administration, which found that for the first time in 16 years, American crude oil production surpassed imports at the end of May.  Additionally, the Paris-based International Energy Agency (IEA) revealed in May that a major increase in North American oil production is sending “shock waves” throughout global energy markets, a phenomenon that could lead to North American energy independence by 2035.  As IEA executive director Maria van der Hoeven put it: “North America has set off a supply shock that is sending ripples throughout the world…A real game changer in every way.” IEA predicts that North America will provide 40 percent of new oil supplies by 2018, while the contribution from OPEC will slip to 30 percent. It’s not surprising, then, that one OPEC official has gloomily admitted: “Some member countries are really suffering from U.S. shale oil”…

Indeed.  Saudi mogul Alwaleed bin Talal recently made headlines after writing an open letter to his government warning that fracking has become a threat to the Kingdom.

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OPEC takes backseat to U.S. shale

June 25, 2013

Fracking continues to diminish the influence and domination of global energy markets by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries by increasing American production.  The weakening of OPEC means:  1) a smaller chance of price shocks and supply disruptions, 2) less dependence on hostile Middle Eastern countries, along with a reduced need for political and military entanglement with those countries, and 3) less petrodollars flowing toward terrorism.

This June 4 editorial from the Houston Chronicle explains how technological advances are causing major shifts in the balance of global power:

Move over, OPEC

Things are getting interesting vis a vis OPEC and the U.S. shale industry.

The once-omnipotent oil cartel is taking serious notice of the impact of the shale boom on global oil prices and markets.

As well it should. Increased shale oil production domestically is pushing the U.S. toward potential energy self-sufficiency by 2018, analysts predict. Boosts in shale oil production in this country already are cutting deeply into OPEC’s share of the U.S. oil market.

And that isn’t even to mention the potential impact of shale gas on the oil cartel. It’s turning out that natural gas from shale is the true bonanza wrought by hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the two technologies that have given this country access to one hundred-plus year supplies of energy almost overnight.

Since 1992, expanded use of natural gas by the nation’s electric utilities has dropped greenhouse gas pollution by 20 percent.

Expansion of the use of environmentally friendly natural gas into this nation’s huge transportation sector is in its toddler stages. The possibilities here are enormous – and threatening if you are a global energy cartel beset by internal disagreements over where to set production levels.

For decades, OPEC enforced a “take no prisoners” position on oil prices that sent the global and U.S. economies on costly roller-coaster rides tied to price and availability of oil.

We wouldn’t go so far as to suggest that the U.S. take a formal position of tit for tat.

We’d simply say that the shale boom offers the country, and perhaps the world, the opportunity of slipping OPEC’s leash while stabilizing the U.S. and other economies.

Common sense tells us we should take it, and leave OPEC to deal with the consequences on its own…

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Fracking our way to energy independence

June 25, 2012

Using hydraulic fracturing to extract heretofore inaccessible energy deposits under the surface of American soil sounds great, but can it really make a difference compared to the oil production juggernaut that is Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf?

Yes indeed.  Even Thompson Reuters has conceded that fracking dramatically increases production.  Take a look at this graphic that shows the significant impact that fracking has had on production in Texas and North Dakota:

More so than sifting through millions of financial transaction data for suspicious activity, more so than combing through thousands of currency transaction reports, more so than sanctioning and blacklisting individual foreign terrorists overseas who may or may not even have any accounts in a Western bank, fracking presents one of the best tools for draining terrorists’ wealth.

Fracking increases U.S. energy output, reduces global prices, lowers dependence on Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf, and minimizes the wealth that accrues to hostile foreign powers who reallocate the profits toward terrorism.