Posts Tagged ‘natural gas’

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Fracking lets us ditch Saudi oil to use our own

September 26, 2014

As part of the run-up to Money Jihad’s five-year anniversary, we’re looking back at five important videos from over the past several years about the financing of terrorism.

Last week we looked at money that has been pumped into the Gulf monarchies in oil royalties that they have turned around to use for terror for decades to placate their own Wahhabi domestic religious/political partners.  But what are we going to do about it? Drill our way out. U.S. energy independence from Arab oil, largely driven by technological innovation through hydraulic fracturing, may be the biggest strategic game-changer in the global balance of power since World War II.

From a Fox News interview last year with the Wall Street Journal’s Steve Moore and national security analyst KT McFarland:

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Energy output falling on federal lands

October 26, 2012

One of the best developments of the last couple years has been increased energy production in the U.S.  No thanks to government policy, crude oil and natural gas production have grown on private land.  Meanwhile, oil and natural gas production on federally owned land have fallen during the Obama administration.

From Energy Tomorrow blog on Oct. 19:

…First, graphing U.S. crude oil production from federal and non-federal areas:

Oil output in America:  public vs. private

As you can see, U.S. crude production has increased steadily since 2008 (blue top line). Remember, the oil production timeline is a long one. Offshore and onshore projects can take up to a decade to develop, from leasing to actual production. Broken out by area, crude production on non-federal lands (69.7 percent of total production) has risen dramatically since 2010 (red line). Since 2010 crude production from areas controlled by the federal government has fallen (green line).

Here’s a look a natural gas production, federal and non-federal:

American nat gas output:  private vs. public

Overall domestic natural gas production (blue line) has climbed sharply – owing to advances in shale development through hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. Look at the red line. Production from non-federal areas parallels the top line, indicating overall growth is being driven by production from areas not controlled by Washington. Indeed, natural gas from federally controlled areas started declining in 2009.

These charts suggest something important: Imagine what could happen with U.S. oil and natural gas production with increased access to public resources, with increased drilling. With the right policies in place the production line for federal areas could mirror that of the non-federal.

Actually, we don’t have to imagine too much. According to Wood Mackenzie’s analysis, we could see more domestic energy produced, more jobs and more revenues to government. In less than 15 years we could see 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs met through domestic oil and gas production, increases in biofuels and crude from friend and neighbor Canada. And we could see all of the plot lines on both these charts heading up, reflecting a more secure U.S. energy future.

As good as the increased growth overall has been to help wean America off Saudi sharia oil, think of how much farther we could be with energy independence if we had leaders willing to use the oil and natural gas sitting underneath land owned by the taxpayers.  We as taxpayers own the land, but we’re not getting a good return on our investment.

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Finding manna from heaven under the sea

September 10, 2012

The Financial Times has an excellent article on recent natural gas discoveries off the coast of Israel.  For many decades, the commonly held perception of Israel was that it is the only country in the Middle East without oil.  The recent discoveries, which involved hard work and long odds, turn the old perception on its head.

Energy independence is extremely important for the U.S. and the West at large.  But it may be a matter of existential survival for Israel.  Israel has had to depend exclusively on imported energy in the past, leaving it vulnerable to price shocks and supply interruptions.  Natural gas deposits at Tamar and Leviathan will go a long way in helping Israel to write its own future.

Here’s a long excerpt, but you should take a look at the full piece:

Field of dreams: Israel’s natural gas

Aug. 31

By Tobias Buck

After decades of importing every drop of fuel, Israel has struck it rich, uncovering vast reserves of natural gas in the Mediterranean

The black and yellow helicopter heads north from Tel Aviv, passing over empty beaches, a yacht harbour and a string of sprawling seafront residences that house some of Israel’s wealthiest families. After a few minutes the pilot makes a sharp turn to the left and steers his ageing Bell 412 towards the open sea.

For more than half an hour, all there is to see is the blue waters of the Mediterranean. Then suddenly a hulking mass of brightly painted steel rises from the midday haze. Towering more than 100m above the water, this is the Sedco Express, a drilling rig that has been operating in this stretch of ocean for almost three years. As the helicopter touches down on the landing pad, we see a small blue and white Star of David flag fluttering in the wind. It is the only sign that the Sedco Express sits atop one of the greatest treasures that Israel has ever found. Far below, connected to the rig by a slender steel pipe that runs through 1,700m of ocean and another 4,500m of rock and sand, lies a vast reservoir of natural gas known as the Tamar field.

The men on board the Sedco Express are busy testing the field’s multiple wells in preparation for the long-awaited day next April, when a US-Israeli consortium will start pumping the gas onshore. With reserves of almost 10 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, the Tamar field is a hugely valuable asset for the Israeli economy. Discovered in January 2009, it was the biggest gas find in the world that year, and by far the biggest ever made in Israeli waters. But the record held for barely two years. In December 2010, Tamar was dwarfed by the discovery of the Leviathan gasfield some 20 miles farther east – the largest deepwater gas reservoir found anywhere in the world over the past decade. The two fields, together with a string of smaller discoveries, will cover Israel’s domestic demand for gas for at least the next 25 years, and still leave hundreds of billions of cubic feet for sale abroad. The government take from the gasfields alone is forecast to reach at least $140bn over the next three decades – a staggering sum for a relatively small economy such as Israel’s.

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Fracking our way to energy independence

June 25, 2012

Using hydraulic fracturing to extract heretofore inaccessible energy deposits under the surface of American soil sounds great, but can it really make a difference compared to the oil production juggernaut that is Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf?

Yes indeed.  Even Thompson Reuters has conceded that fracking dramatically increases production.  Take a look at this graphic that shows the significant impact that fracking has had on production in Texas and North Dakota:

More so than sifting through millions of financial transaction data for suspicious activity, more so than combing through thousands of currency transaction reports, more so than sanctioning and blacklisting individual foreign terrorists overseas who may or may not even have any accounts in a Western bank, fracking presents one of the best tools for draining terrorists’ wealth.

Fracking increases U.S. energy output, reduces global prices, lowers dependence on Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf, and minimizes the wealth that accrues to hostile foreign powers who reallocate the profits toward terrorism.

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Environmental, sharia-free benefits of fracking

June 20, 2012

The West’s reliance on Persian Gulf oil (and the resulting profits that Arab fat cats use to fund terror) is diminishing thanks in part to the innovation of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” in the U.S. which enables energy production from underground resources that used to be too difficult to access.  Environmentalists, the EPA, and media outfits like NPR have tried desperately to create a negative perception about fracking, but it turns out that fracking actually reduces carbon emissions.

By the way, do you think the sharia sheiks of Saudi Arabia give a rat’s behind about the environmental impacts of oil drilling in the desert?  No.  One of the best ways to de-fund sharia and jihad, and to maintain the cleanest possible standards for energy productions, is to produce energy ourselves.  From the Economist late last month:

America’s falling carbon-dioxide emissions

Some fracking good news

May 25th 2012, 15:28 by A.W. | LONDON

The International Energy Agency has just released some data that green-minded fans of shale gas should appreciate. The organisation’s latest figures show that America’s carbon-dioxide emissions from generating energy have fallen by 450m tonnes, more than in any other country over the past five years. The turnaround has been welcomed by many, and Fatih Birol, the IEA’s chief economist, ascribes much of the credit to a shift away from dirty coal towards cleaner gas, according to an article in the Financial Times.

The importance of coal in America’s energy mix has indeed tumbled since 1997, from almost half of electricity generation to just 36.7% in February, according to America’s Energy Information Administration (see chart). This has come about mostly because of an increase in the use of natural gas (from 21.6% to 29.4% over the same period) rather than renewable energy (from 8.3% to 12.1%).

However, the numbers may not be welcome among all environmentalists, some of whom tend to loathe shale gas because of the “fracking” process through which it is released from rock formations. Some greens claim that fracking contaminates the air and groundwater and can even cause earthquakes (although there is no evidence linking fracking to increased seismic activity, according to the US Geological Survey)…